History

History

Nearly 50 years ago, the Plymouth Guild had its beginnings as a series of tent shows. In 2007, The Plymouth Center for the Arts was established in two historic buildings on North Street located just steps from Plymouth Rock and the town waterfront. The beautifully restored 1902 Russell Library gallery and the 18th century Lindens building possess uncommonly elegant spaces that showcase diverse work created by regional artists... It’s a wonderful place to visit.

The Russell Gallery 

In 1901, the children of the late William G. Russell and Mary Ellen (Hedge) Russell offered to build a library in memory of their parents as a gift to the Plymouth Public Library, which had lacked a permanent home of its own since its incorporation in 1856. The Library accepted the gift as ‘the most valuable and important in its history’, and quickly secured the easterly portion of the Hathaway property as a building site, next to the house, vacant except for the row of historic linden trees. The Russell Library, designed by the Boston Architectural firm of Mead & Everett in the Colonial Revival Style, opened to the public June of 1902. The building stood out with great distinction on North Street, with its cream-colored brick, white sandstone, with a slate roof. Interior features included a white marble fireplace, an antique frieze supplied by P.P. Caproni and Brother of Boston, and a bronze dedication plaque.  The building also featured architectural components installed specifically for its use as a library, including antique coppered steel book stacks extending from the first floor to the double ceiling height through a glass floored second level. The Library was noted for its classic beauty and acknowledged as ‘an ornament to the town’.